New Android auto-rooting adware almost ‘impossible’ to remove

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Security alert: New Android auto-rooting adware almost ‘impossible’ to remove

It found the trojanized adware masquerading as legitimate top applications, including Candy Crush, Facebook, GoogleNow, NYTimes, Okta, Snapchat, Twitter, WhatsApp, and many others.

“Adware, which has traditionally been used to aggressively push ads, is now becoming trojanized and sophisticated. This is a new trend for adware and an alarming one at that,” Lookout said in a blogpost.

Malicious actors behind these families repackage and inject malicious code into thousands of popular applications found in Google Play, and then later publish them to third-party app stores. “Indeed, we believe many of these apps are actually fully-functional, providing their usual services, in addition to the malicious code that roots the device.”

Unlike older types of adware that were obvious and obnoxious, prompting users to uninstall them, this new type of adware is silent, working in the background. These malicious apps root the device unbeknownst to the user. To add insult to injury, victims will likely not be able to uninstall the malware, leaving them with the options of either seeking out professional help to remove it, or simply purchasing a new device.

The act of rooting the device in the first place creates additional security risk for enterprises and individuals alike, as other apps can then get root access to the device, giving them unrestricted access to files outside of their domain. Usually applications are not allowed to access the files created by other applications, however with root access, those limitation are easily bypassed.

Over the past year, Lookout has studied three interconnected families of adware. It discovered the family Shuanet, which, like all of these families, auto-roots the device and hides in the system directory. Kemoge, or ShiftyBug, recently made headlines for rooting the victim’s device and installing secondary payload apps. Another family, Shedun, also referred to as GhostPush, is yet another example of this trojanized adware. While many classify these as simple “adware,” these families are trojans.

Together, the three are responsible for over 20,000 repackaged apps, including Okta’s two-factor authentication app.

The highest detections for these three families together are in the United States, Germany, Iran, Russia, India, Jamaica, Sudan, Brazil, Mexico, and Indonesia.

For individuals, getting infected with Shedun, Shuanet, and ShiftyBug might mean a trip to the store to buy a new phone. Because these pieces of adware root the device and install themselves as system applications, they become nearly impossible to remove, usually forcing victims to replace their device in order to regain normalcy.

For enterprises, having rooted devices on the network is a concern, especially if those devices were rooted by a repackaged version of a legitimate and popular enterprise app. In this rooted state, an everyday victim won’t have the proper interface to control what apps on the phone request root access. The problem here is that these apps may gain access to data they shouldn’t have access to, given their escalated privileges.

Developers, of course, should be concerned about brand reputation. Legitimate application developers are often unjustly blamed for the malicious actions of malware that repackaged their applications. In reality, both the user and the app developer here are victims of malware.

“We expect this class of trojanized adware to continue gaining sophistication over time, leveraging its root privilege to further exploit user devices, allow additional malware to gain read or write privileges in the system directory, and better hide evidence of its presence and activities,” the firm added. “We believe more families of adware trojanizing popular apps will emerge in the near future and look to dig its heels into the reserved file system to avoid being removed.”


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